Speaker Biographies2018-04-24T12:24:42+00:00
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Bram Abramson

Open Web Fellow, Mozilla Foundation

Panel 3: Responsibility for Defamation and the Problem of Intermediaries

Bram Abramson is currently an Open Web Fellow with Mozilla Foundation, hosted by the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs’ Citizen Lab; and serves as a director of the Commission for Complaints for Telecom-television Services, panel member with the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council, and lecturer at Ryerson University’s School of Creative Industries. Past roles include head of law, regulation, and public policy at TekSavvy, an independent telco; media and telecom lawyer at McCarthy Tétrault; and senior analyst at the CRTC (Ottawa) and TeleGeography (Washington, DC).

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Christina Angelopoulos

Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law (CIPIL), University of Cambridge

Panel 3: Responsibility for Defamation and the Problem of Intermediaries

 

Christina Angelopoulos is a lecturer in intellectual property at the University of Cambridge and a member of CIPIL (Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law). She specialises in copyright, with a particular focus on intermediary liability. From 2011 to 2015, she wrote her PhD on the European harmonisation of the liability of online intermediaries for the copyright infringements of third parties at the Institute for Information Law (IViR) of the University of Amsterdam. Her thesis was published by Kluwer Law International in 2016 under the title “European Intermediary Liability in Copyright”.

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Jane Bailey

Full Professor, Common Law, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa; The eQuality Project Co-Leader

Panel 2: The Harms and Values Underlying Defamation Law in the Internet Age

Jane Bailey is a Full Professor of Law at the University of Ottawa where she conducts research and teaches about the intersections of law, technology and equality.  She and Dr Valerie Steeves co-lead The eQuality Project, a 7-year SSHRC funded partnership of researchers, educators, advocates, civil society groups, and policymakers who are interested in examining the impact of online commercial profiling on children’s identities and social relationships.  Jane leads the Project stream focused on cyberviolence and vulnerable youth.  Among her proudest professional achievements are co-leading The eGirls Project (with Valerie Steeves), creating and teaching a first-year law course called Cyberfeminism and, in her former life as a litigator, assisting as counsel in the first online hate propagation case to be heard by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. Jane w